Markdown Guide

Introduction

To contribute to PIRL documentation you’ll have to use “markdown” formatting. Markdown is one of many ways to do documentation. It’s probably not the best and certainly not the worst. It’s easy to get into and allow for a self-consistent documentation cycle.

Below you’ll find some examples of how to use markdown along with our recommendations and best practices. Please use our recommendations when composing PIRL documentation so that it looks well put together with the rest of the content. Also, make sure to take look at Style Guide for additional guidelines regarding content formatting.

Example Markdown Document

Below is an example document using markdown. This document will be rendered by the software to display as described.

Basic Markdown Guide

Main Title

The main document title is displayed at the top of the document using the largest font. In markdown, the title goes at the very top of the document in between the --- section as shown below for this very document.

---
title: Markdown Guide
weight: 5
---

Headers

Headers are usually sized from H1 (largest) to H6 (smallest). Markdown is no different. The number representing the size of the header is represented by a #. A single # is equivalent to H1, two ## is equivalent to H2, etc.

# This is an H1 tag
## This is an H2 tag
### This is an H3 tag
#### This is an H4 tag
##### This is an H5 tag
###### This is an H6 tag

PIRL TIP: The major sections of a document start with ## or H2

Emphasis

To italicize text, use a single set of asterisks around it. To mark text as bold, use a set of two asterisks around it. To strike out some text, use two tildes (~) around it.

*This text will be italicized*
**This text will be in bold**
_**What about bold italic**_
~~Did I say something wrong?~~
<center>I am centered writer</center>

This text will be italicized

This text will be in bold

What about bold italic

Did I say something wrong?

I am centered writer

Citation

To quote something, use a right sharp bracket >And do your quote!

>**Manual to this article**: You have to read this article from front to back and show your grace. After all, that is how literature works, right?
(unless it is instruction manual, in which case no one reads them at all)

Manual to this article: You have to read this article from front to back and show your grace. After all, that is how literature works, right? (unless it is instruction manual, in which case no one reads them at all)

Table

If you want to create a simple table in Atom text editor, you can simply time down “table” and hit an Enter! If you are writing in notepad, well, then I wish sincere condolences :) But by writing down those symbols, you can create a single rows and columns.

Here you have two examples:

| Header One     | Header Two     |
| :------------- | :------------- |
| Item One       | Item Two       |
Header One Header Two
Item One Item Two
|[Web page](https://pirl.io/)|[White Paper](https://storage.gra1.cloud.ovh.net/v1/AUTH_33a0c4ac73cf4d88a243480c275be8ac/pirl/pirl-whitepaper.pdf)| [Twitter](https://twitter.com/PirlOfficial)  |
|:------------- |:-------------:| -----:|

Web page White Paper Twitter

Lists

Ordered lists are created by using 1. for the find item and then incrementing with each subsequent line. Unordered lists are created by using +.

1. First
2. Second
3. Third

+ Satoshi
+ Vitalik
+ PIRL

1. This is first
  + First thing
2. This is Second
  + Second thing
3. This is Third
  + Third thing
  1. First
  2. Second
  3. Third
  • Satoshi
  • Vitalik
  • PIRL
  1. This is first
    • First thing
  2. This is Second
    • Second thing
  3. This is Third
    • Third thing

Making links simply involves pasting a URL between a set of () parenthesis. There are also a couple extra options.

This is an [example link](http://example.com/ "With a Title"). It will still work if the only thing included is the link within the parenthesis.

This is an example link. It will still work if the only thing included is the link within the parenthesis.

Images

Linking images is just like links with a shortcode

* 

Code

There are two ways to distinguish code from text, one for inline use and one for blocks of code. To distinguish code inline put a set of back ticks around it. To do it as a block of text, put three back ticks at the tom and the bottom.

This is will be displayed a as a block of code.
More importantly, notice the back ticks at the top and bottom.

Author: PrimateCrypto

Contributor(s):

@dptelecom